Auroville Institute for Integral Health AIIH
Healthcare, Prevention, Research, Education

This project is being already implemented on 2 levels:

Construction has started in feb 2011 and “Kailash Clinic” is functioning 7 days a week since 2009 as a multipurpose healthclinic with allopathic and alternative medicine being practised in a tiny space.

Next steps will be to set up a bigger organisational structure incl. website, finalising the construction (towards mid 2013) and enlarging the scope of collaboration with professional therapists from Auroille towards an integrative health care.

Project Proposal
The Community of Auroville:
Auroville is a community project that was initiated by the vision of the Mother, in 1968. Her vision was to create an international community that is rooted in the realization of human unity. It should also be noted that this unity in diversity is to be held within the overall evolution of human consciousness.
Auroville today finds itself in a unique position to further global research into integral health and medicine in line with its Charter, point 4 states that: “Auroville will be a site of material and spiritual researches for a living embodiment of an actual Human Unity”.
Since its inauguration, the community has steadily grown and is currently inhabited by over two thousand residents representing over fifty different nationalities. The activities pursued by these residents are numerous and in many cases are on the cutting edge of holistically conscious technology: Village development, education, business, land restoration, renewable energy, experimental construction techniques, traditional and complementary health care, as well as numerous cultural activities are all presently being explored and expanded as Auroville evolves as a society. Thus, Auroville could be defined as a multi-cultural meeting point and living laboratory that is exploring the frontier of a new millennium in conscious living. Whatever Auroville’s material achievements, however, the main aim is the inner change, for Auroville understands that without a radical change in consciousness, no permanent outer change can be effected.
Auroville has received the endorsement of the General Conference of UNESCO in four resolutions and of the Government of India, which has accorded it a unique legal status.
Mission Statement:
The mission of the Institute for Integral Health is to provide the community of Auroville with an effective health care system. It has chosen to accomplish this task by adopting the recently emerging health care model called the integrative practice of medicine. This model is based upon the collaboration of multiple systems working together to provide comprehensive holistic care: These include but are not limited to; western allopathic, naturopathic, traditional Asian and energetic methods of healing. By combining the various diagnostic and treatment strengths of diverse systems, the integrative model effectively addresses where the current system is limited. It does this by providing low cost health care that prevents and treats disease. This subject will be more deeply explored further in this proposal.
The current population of the Auroville community is over 2000 people, with up to 3000 in the guest season. A community of this size clearly needs its own health care system. Therefore, the Institute has dedicated itself to effectively providing comprehensive heath care to the community of Auroville by adopting the Integrative model of medicine.
Vision: The Integrative Medical Model

An integrative model of medicine holds to the truth that the human being is more complex than merely the combination of biology and physiology. One way to look at it is, that we are more like a garden than a machine. In a machine, you can separate each individual part from one another and still clearly understand its function. Whereas for a garden to be healthy and flourish, vast ranges of multidimensional relationships need to be held in balance; the soil, the seeds, proper sunlight, temperature, and nutrition are a few to name here. This is the basic difference between what is called reduction and non-reduction science. In the non-reduction system, clarity is found by looking at the individual in relationship to the whole. In the reduction way of looking at things, you cut the whole into smaller and smaller pieces in an attempt to understand it.
Modern physics has actually validated that the only way to truly comprehend the nature of reality is through looking at things in a non-reduction way. However, traditional allopathic medicine as it is currently practiced has not been able to embrace this non-reduction scientific fact. This is not to say that standard allopathic medicine does not have its place; it just needs to be understood where that place is. Its diagnostics and emergency care are one example of where it is superior. However, in the realm of most chronic disease that is plaguing large portions of the present earth’s population, it has been clearly demonstrated that the allopathic way is far from effective; side effects from toxic pharmaceuticals, high costs, and its futility in the prevention and treatment of chronic illness are now being well recognized. Without a doubt, a new model based upon a more holistic understanding is needed to overcome this situation.
We wish to emphasize that the patient has a major responsibility for his/her health through leading a healthy balanced life as well as developing a deeper awareness for his/her role in caring for our planet.
The recently emerging integrative model of medicine recognizes that there is no irrelevant part of the whole picture. It then offers comprehensive holistic care by embracing and utilizing the strengths and weaknesses of a wide variety of medical systems and traditions. In order to practice by this model there are many factors that need to be considered. The following points are some of the essentials:
o All the modalities practicing in this collaborative way see the importance of holding the entire picture in consideration.
o Practitioners that are part of an integrative team embrace the reality that we are affected by our lifestyle, emotions and psychology. In fact, medical science has recently shown that simple low cost dietary and lifestyle measures are effective in the prevention and reversal of up to 95 percent of many modern day chronic diseases; diabetes, heart disease and certain kinds of cancer are a few to name here. This knowledge is therefore established into an integrative clinical team’s overall approach to health care.
o To state the obvious, preventative measures to healthcare are just as important, if not more so, than illness based approaches. If you can keep the people from getting sick, it is clearly better than taking care of them once they are!
o Each patient’s care is individually tailored to his or her needs. This involves the development of new holistic lines of diagnostics and treatments.
o An understanding that the body’s life force is always in the direction of positive health; what is referred to in biology as homeostasis. This inherent self-healing capacity is then utilized in the process of prevention as well as treatment.
o The importance of diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools that are non-toxic, minimally invasive, and inexpensive is honored.

In order to achieve this mission, there are three categories of activities that the proposed Health Institute will be engaged in. These three categories comprise the essential pillars needed to effectively practice integrative medicine.
The Three Pillars of Integrative Medicine:
1. Integral patient care
2. Education and Research
3. Public Health Care

Integral Patient Care
There are several features that are inherent to the day-to-day practice of Integral Patient Care. Some of the primary ones are:
1. The Team: An experienced multi-disciplinary practitioner team comprised of individuals who have a sincere aspiration to practice integrative medicine. This aspiration is born from insight into the strengths and limitations of individual medical systems, as well as by seeing the value of forming alliances with other schools of thought. Therefore, all practitioners that are part of this team will possess a willingness to educate themselves as to these other systems, as well as be open to collaborating with them.
2. The Facility: A clinic that provides appropriate space for the comprehensive practice and collaboration of all therapies. Plans are to include treatment rooms suitable for the specifics of each of the modalities, a meeting area, a diagnostic lab, medical imagery, an emergency first aid and minor surgery room, and an integrative pharmacy (including, but not limited to allopathic, herbal, nutritional, homeopathic, and flower remedies).
3. Integrative Patient Care: Patient care will be based upon all systems of medicine working in a complementary relationship with one another. In addition to everyday clinical practice, certain activities will be in place to support the process of integration. Such as:
• Health Navigation: A trained Navigator serves the purpose of helping guide the patient and the practitioners in the process of creating integrative treatment plans. The Navigator facilitates this process by possessing a familiarity with traditional and complementary medical systems as well as the patient’s unique situation. They then guide the patient and practitioners by designing and keeping to an evolving treatment plan.
• Patient Care Conferences: Weekly meetings with the practitioner team as well as the Navigator to discuss any day-to-day clinical issues. In these meetings, any of the practitioners may present a case and get the teams input. Or specific clinical topics may be chosen for discussion such as; a multimodality dialogue on the treatment of various conditions or any other pertinent clinical issue.
• Shared medical record: Part of the practice of Integrative medicine is for each patient to have one medical chart that is shared for his or her entire care. This allows for the medical treatment to be seen by each provider in relationship to the whole picture. This chart then also serves as part of the process in educating all providers about their colleague’s systems of medicine.
• Patient Education
4. Home Health Care Service: For accidents, post operative, and the elderly, and for people who are too ill to come to the clinic, an on-call doctor, nurse or therapist will make home visits.
5. A referral network and liaison with qualified practitioners and health care facilities: Relationships will be made within and outside of Auroville with specialists and facilities that fill health care needs where the clinic is unable to do so.
2. Education & Research:
The integrative model of medicine holds that health is a combination of mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing. That being the case, for it to be practiced, the practitioners as well as the public need to be involved in a process of education and research.
Education
Auroville has a wide selection of sources that can be utilized to fill this requirement; there are numerous talented health practitioners, many competent exercise instructors, classes on nutrition, spiritual and psychological counselors and a wide range of workshops currently to draw upon. Part of the job of the Health institute will be to educate itself as well as the community. This is a necessary step for the clinical team; to recognize what is needed and then determine how to use what is available, or to invite healthcare professionals from outside of Auroville, to effectively fill those needs. This subject matter is too vast to be completely outlined here. However, for the purpose of this proposal, a general list of educational categories that are required in the practice of integrative medicine is now provided.

Categories of Education:

• Health Education: In order for Integrative medicine to be practiced, the community that it serves needs to have proper education about healthy living available. This primarily consists of classes and literature that address the triad of physical, emotional, mental, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. For example topics are:
o The management of stress and lifestyle related issues such as chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, insomnia, migraines and chronic back issues.
• Team member education: In addition to the task of continuing education in one’s chosen field of medicine, all members of an integrative medical unit need to be continuously expanding their knowledge about other disciplines. The key point here is not to learn how to practice other systems of medicine, but rather when to incorporate them as part of an integrative treatment plan. This aspect of education forms the foundation for appropriate referrals as well as lifestyle recommendations.
• Introductory Integrative Medical Courses to Medical Professionals within and outside of Auroville: Introductory certificate and diploma courses in the Integral Paradigm of preventative as well as curative medicine will be developed and offered to the professional medical community. Subjects will be covered such as Integrative approaches to: Physiology and anatomy, various pathologies, first aid, and any other topic that has been learned through the first hand experience of the Institute.
• Professional Trainings: Another part of the health institute’s long-term vision is to offer professional training certificate programs. These will be in areas such as; Integral Psychotherapy, Craniosacral Therapy, Acupuncture, Massage, etc. and will be developed and offered to:
o Health professionals who wish to expand their scope of practice
o Or anyone with a sincere aspiration to enter into the field of healing arts.

Research
Like already mentioned, research and education go hand in hand. This is due to the simple fact that in order to educate research has to be done, and in the process of researching one is being educated. That being said there are certain projects that are referred to as a research projects. In these types of projects, information is gathered in order to determine what is true or not. Once this is recognized, it can then be published. This research then serves to educate the professional as well as the lay community.
Part of Auroville’s as well as the health institute’s vision is to share itself with the world. Research is one of the main means where the Health institute plans to take part in this vision.
From an integrative medical perspective, research studies can be broken into various categories. The following is a list and brief description of some of these categories as well as example studies within them:
• Comparison based studies: The effectiveness of integrative medicine in comparison to the standard allopathic model in the treatment of specific conditions.
o Chronic lower back pain: A multilayered study based upon a comparison in overall pain levels. Comparison would be made between non-surgical, surgical, non-surgical integrative and post-surgical integrative approaches.
o The treatment of Depression: This study would focus on overall mood levels in patients diagnosed with various states of depression. The comparison would then be made between the standard allopathic SSRI treatment and either an integrative non-pharmaceutical and/or integrative pharmaceutical protocols.
• Modality specific studies: This is when research is done to determine the effectiveness of any specific modality. Some examples are:
o The prevention and treatment of either Diabetes or Heart Disease with a non-animal protein based whole food diet.
o Cranial Sacral efficacy in the treatment of post motor vehicle whiplash syndromes.
o Acupuncture’s efficacy in pain management
o Or mindfulness based stress reduction as part of the treatment process in hypertension.
• Studies into the scientific method itself: This is an investigation into the question of how to conduct studies themselves. Is it possible, or how to get a clear picture when using the current reductionist scientific method to analyze a non-reductionist method such as Integrative medicine? This is a topic that is outside of this author’s qualifications to say anything further about; so for now, it will just be presented as an interesting example.
• The Institutes internal research: This is taking a look at how the Institute itself is functioning. This type of research involves gathering and reviewing suggestions and feedback from the community as well as from the members of the Institute itself. Once information is gathered it is then analyzed. Then we can determine which changes need to be made and how to go about making them.

3. Prevention through Public Health Care
Public health care is described as hygienic and epidemiological supervision for disease prevention caused by environmental, social, nutritional risk factors. There needs to be a system in place for the community to deal with the spread of infections and poisons through various media such as water, air, soil and food and also to deal with disasters. The following services need to be provided:
1. Identification: Keeping up with and identifying risk factors creating standards and regulations to deal with their possible consequences.
2. Monitoring and control
3. Public notification system
4. Emergency Response: Trained emergency response teams that are able to handle evacuations in cases of high health hazards
5. Education: Teaching, instruction and training of the general public, volunteers, staff, etc
Proposed Development
Presently the Health Institute is composed of a team of multidisciplinary health professionals and an administrative management team. Since 2008, they have been engaged in the process of developing the Institute and have been occupying a Clinic at Kailash in Auroville. This is a small rented space that the present team has already outgrown. It is clear that the project is ready to move onto its next stage of evolution. Thus a two-phase plan has been created:

The Two Phase Development Plan
Site permission has been granted on a 2.5 acre piece of land in Auroville, on crown road. We are just awaiting building permission prior to the actual commencement of construction.
Phase I – This includes only those requirements for which construction can be completed by the end of 2013.
Phase II – Builds additional spaces and expands the range of outpatient holistic care; adding X-ray, ultrasound and more facilities for inpatient care. This phase is planned to be completed by the end of 2015.
A more detailed explanation of these two phases is now provided:
Building Parameters
Green building
Green building is a practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources– energy, water, materials–while reducing impacts on human health and the environment throughout the building’s life cycle. It accomplishes this through better sitting, design, construction, operation, and maintenance.
Around the world, scientists now speak about a “carbon footprint” that is directly related to global warming and a “green house effect” damaging the whole ecosystem of our planet. Green building starts with reducing the carbon footprint.
The Institute’s infrastructure will be modeled on integrated systems design and sustainable building principles, creating a synergy of function to provide:
• Temperature control: Optimum passive cooling as opposed to powered air conditioning, maximising stable temperatures throughout the day. Even at the hottest time of the year, the inside temperature should never rises above 33.5 degrees Celsius.
• Privacy: The principles of construction provide for minimal sound impact, limiting exposure to sound pollution. The rooms can be closed to provide confidentiality without interfering with temperature control.
• Cleanliness: Proficient construction prevents the intrusion of dirt and insects thereby providing an environment which requires a minimum of time and energy to maintain hygiene.
• Low-maintenance: The combination of efficient construction and protection from the elements ensures an overall reduction in maintenance expenditures and a longer structural lifespan.
• Design and arrangements: Feng shui and/or Vastu will be incorporated.
Infrastructure:
Water: The Institute has a preliminary agreement for connection to the existing well at Arka (which was initially made for an anticipated Integral Health Centre).
Electricity: Connection to the existing transformer next to Surrender community needs to be verified with Auroville Electric Service.
Solar System: Mainly for lighting purposes.
Waste Water Treatment Plant
Rain Water Harvesting
Landscaping: The envisioned surrounding gardens with ponds and pathways will give a park-like atmosphere to the area.

Quality Assurance
Quality Management System (ISO-9001) will be adopted and implemented over a period of a 2 year period. During 2009, the core management team will work out and document procedures to be followed at the Institute and follow a process of continuous monitoring, internal audit and external audit.
Beneficiaries
All Aurovilians, Newcomers, guests, students and volunteers of Auroville.
Project Team
Executives
Jocelyn Brynhild
Dr. Ruslan Yeskendirov
Dr. Sumeet Kumar
Manfred Lehnert

Core Team Members
Moghan Mehlem
Veronica Stansby
Organization Chart
Funding Sources
Project Funding (Setup)
1. Individual donations from Aurovilians
2. Donations from Auroville Units
3. Donations from AVI, Friends of Auroville
4. Auroville Municipal Services Fund and FAMC
5. Auroville Foundation
6. Other Donors
Operational funding (Recurring Expenses)
Auroville Central Fund – for maintenances of staff, operational expenses, utilities, etc.
Auroville Health Fund (community fund for health care supported by monthly contributions made by all those utilising the service) – for running expenses
Payments for the services rendered to registered guests of Auroville
Regular donations from Aurovilians and Friends of Auroville
Space requirements
Phase I
Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Waiting Area + Reception + Medical Records 1 30 30
Consultation Rooms 3 16 48
Physiotherapy / Osteopathy 1 16 16
Emergency Room + Minor OT 1 24 24
Dressing rooms (clean and septic) 2 12 24
In-patient rooms 2 15 30
Laboratory 1 24 24
Pharmacy 1 24 24
Office + Meeting + Admin Room 1 30 30
Toilets / showers 1 16 16
Staff Room + Small Pantry 1 30 30
Laundry 1 6 6
Store room 1 12 12
Maintenance, with its own store 1 12 12
Sterilization 1 6 6
Total Carpet Area 332
Total Plinth Area 465

Phase II
Medical Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Physiotherapy Room 2 14 28
Emergency Room 1 25 25
Observation Room 1 20 20
In-patient Rooms 4 16 64
X-Ray 1 30 30
Scan, ECG 1 14 14
Dressing Room 1 14 14
Pharmacy – second room 1 14 14
Toilet/shower 2 No. – 10sq.m and 6sq.m 1 16 16
Laundry 1 12 12
Waste Collection 1 10 10
Store room 2 12 24
Sterilization 1 10 10
Total Carpet Area 281
Total Plinth Area 393

Note: Staff Room and Planning/Meeting Rooms moved to Common Block

Natural Therapies Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Waiting Area + Reception 1 18 18
Acupuncture Room 1 25 25
Cranio Sacral Therapy Room 1 20 20
Psycho therapy and Homeopathy Room 1 20 20
Ayurveda Room 1 20 20
Energy Therapies Room 1 20 20
Yoga Therapy + Small Groups Rooms 1 30 30
Training + Workshops + Library + Big Groups 1 50 50
Toilet/shower 2 + dressing 1 20 20
Maintenance, with its own store 1 12 12
Total Carpet Area 235
Total Plinth Area 329

Admin/Common Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Computer Room 1 20 20
Public Health 1 25 25
Cafeteria 1 50 50
Total Carpet Area 95
Total Plinth Area 133

Staff/Guest Quarters Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Rooms 2 30 60
Common Room 1 20 20
Total Carpet Area 80
Total Plinth Area 112

Total Carpet Area for Phase II 691
Total Plinth Area for Phase II 967
Budget
Phase I
Budget Heading Cost per unit in Rs. Number of Units Total Cost in Rs. Total Cost in Euros
1 € = Rs. 65 Total Cost in Dollars
1 $US = Rs. 50
1. Construction costs 15,000 389 sq.m. 69,75,000 107,308 139,500
including Rainwater harvesting
2. Infrastructure 10,96,000 16,861 21,920
– Electrical connection to a transformer 100,000
– Connection to the water well of Arka 50,000

– Roads and path ways 150,000
– Gate and fencing 150,000
– Parking shade 40,000
– Telephone / Internet 20,000
– Landscaping + clearing the ground 31,000
– Waste Water Treatment Plant 250,000
– Solar system 200,000
3. Other Costs 25,00,000 38,461 50,000
– equipment – medical
– equipment – office 1,900,000
600,000
TOTAL 105,71,000 162,631 211,420
Phase II
Budget Heading Cost per unit in Rs. Number of Units Total Cost in Rs. Total Cost in Euros
1 € = Rs. 65 Total Cost in Dollars
1 $US = Rs. 50
1. Construction costs 15,000 967 sq.m. 145,05,000 223,153 290,100
2. Infrastructure 25,00,000 38,460 50,000
3. Other Costs 40,00,000 61,540 80,000
– equipment – medical
– equipment – office 3,200,000
800,000
TOTAL 210,05,000 323,155 420,100
Donations
From Within Auroville
The Institute’s Auroville Financial Services account number is: 251938.
From Outside Auroville
Direct Bank transfer
STATE BANK OF INDIA, AUROVILLE TOWNSHIP, Tamil Nadu, India
Branch Code 03160 Swift Code SBININBB474
Account AUROVILLE UNITY FUND Account Number 10237876508
Narration Please mention [For Auroville Institute for Integral Health]
By Credit Card
in USA:
https://secure.aviusa.org/donations_donatenow.php
in UK:
www.aviuk.org/fundraising.htm
Via Auroville International
Contact information for the various AVI Centers is at http://www.auroville-international.org/main/centres/index.html
Proposed Architectural Plan
Site Plan

Ground Floor Plan

Section View

Aerial View

Glossary
Integral/Holistic Health
Holistic health is an approach to health care that views the human as a multi-dimensional being. It sees the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of life as closely interconnected.
Public Health
Public health is the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals.
Quality Management System
Quality Management System (QMS) can be defined as a set of policies, processes and procedures required for planning and execution (production / development / service) in the core business area of an organization. QMS integrates the various internal processes within the organization and intends to provide a process approach for project execution. QMS enables the organizations to identify, measure, control and improve the various core business processes that will ultimately lead to improved business performance.
ISO
ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards.
• ISO 9001
The ISO 9000 family addresses “quality management”. This means what the organization does to fulfill the customer’s quality requirements, and applicable regulatory requirements, while aiming to enhance customer satisfaction, and achieve continual improvement of its performance in pursuit of its objectives.
• ISO 14001
The ISO 14000 family addresses “environmental management”. This means what the organization does to minimize harmful effects on the environment caused by its activities, and to achieve continual improvement of its environmental performance.
Green Building
Green building is the practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources — energy, water, and materials — while reducing building impacts on human health and the environment during the building’s life cycle, through better siting, design, construction, operation, maintenance.
Appendix 1 – Key Personnel Profiles
Dr. Ruslan Yeskendirov
Nationality Kazakh
Professional degree(s)
• M.D. Pediatrics
Medical/health-care related work experience
• Hospice of Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – March 1999 to January 2002, as a director.
• Regional Pediatric Hospital, Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – in 2000 (11 months), as a doctor-intern.
• ASKO clinic, Pavlodar City – 2000 to 2001, as a general physician.
• Governmental City Emergency Medical Service of Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – October 2001 to February 2002, as a doctor of pediatrics in the ambulance service.
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Auroville Health Centre – April 2002 – May 2008, as a general physician.
• Kailash Clinic – July 2008 till now.
Your role in the project
• Doctor
• Project development
• Organization of medical processes
• Organizational development
Dr. Sumeet Kumar
Nationality Indian
Professional degree(s)
• Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery (M.B.B.S.) in 1983, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay, India.
• Master of Surgery (M.S.) in Gen. Surgery in 1986, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay, India.
Medical/health-care related work experience
• From March 1984 to May 1991, Various Surgical Residency positions, At K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay and R.M.L. Hospital, Delhi, India.
• From June 1991 to Nov 1993, General Surgeon, National Iranian Oil Company, Iran. Managed the surgical facilities at the National Iranian Oil Company Hospital at Masjid Sulayman, Iran.
• From April 1993 to December 1996, Own Surgical Practice at India. Practiced as a Surgical Consultant to a number of hospitals in Bangalore, India.
Other Experience
• Vice President Healthcare Division, Eutech Cybernetics, Singapore from 1997 to 2005. Developed and implemented Hospital Information Systems in SE Asia and USA
Your role in the project
• Represent IHC in legal & professional forums in India
• Help create professional guidelines
• Sign legal documents
• Planning, Fund Raising
Jocelyn Brynhild
Nationality: American

Medical/health-care related work experience
• Homeopathic Educational Services, California – 6 years
• Acupressure Technician, California
• Rosen Practitioner, California
• Center of International Medicine, Oakland, California – Administrator – 3 year
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Consultant for administration at Auroville Quiet Healing Center
Your role in the project
• Executive
• Fund raising

Veronica Stansby
Nationality British
Professional degree(s) Naturopath, Cranio Sacral Biodynamics Therapist, Core Process Psychotherapy, Trauma Therapy
Medical/health-care related work experience
• Clinic for Natural Medicine and Bodywork from 1990 – 2003 Germany
• Craniosacral Therapy and Counseling in both Quiet and Pitanga
from 2001-2007
• Kailash Clinic since August 2008

Your role in the project
• Naturopath, Craniosacral Therapist
• Project development
• Development of Integrative Medical approach
• Organisational development

Moghan Mehlem
Nationality French
Professional degree(s) Psychotherapist
Medical/health-care related work experience
• In France, 1998 to 2008, psychotherapist in psychosomatic and systemic group therapy.
• Trainer
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Psychotherapist working in Pitanga and Kailash Clinic since 3 years
Your role in the project
• Psychotherapist
• Project development
• Development of Training and Education
• Architecture & Construction Supervision

Manfred Lehnert
Nationality German
Professional degree(s) Dipl-Ing. Physikalische Technik (Engineer applied physics)
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Health engineering in safe water, sanitation, safe food, health- and hygienic education in AVHS
Your role in the project
• Executive
• Planning, especially infrastructure, water, waste water, electricity
• Prevention systems

Contact Information
Kailash Clinic
Auroville, 605 101, TN, India
Ph: +91-413-2622803
+91-9442066737 (Dr. Ruslan)
Email: ihs@auroville.org.in

Auroville Institute for Integral Health
Healthcare, Prevention, Research, Education

Project Proposal

The Community of Auroville:
Auroville is a community project that was initiated by the vision of the Mother, in 1968. Her vision was to create an international community that is rooted in the realization of human unity. It should also be noted that this unity in diversity is to be held within the overall evolution of human consciousness.
Auroville today finds itself in a unique position to further global research into integral health and medicine in line with its Charter, point 4 states that: “Auroville will be a site of material and spiritual researches for a living embodiment of an actual Human Unity”.
Since its inauguration, the community has steadily grown and is currently inhabited by over two thousand residents representing over fifty different nationalities. The activities pursued by these residents are numerous and in many cases are on the cutting edge of holistically conscious technology: Village development, education, business, land restoration, renewable energy, experimental construction techniques, traditional and complementary health care, as well as numerous cultural activities are all presently being explored and expanded as Auroville evolves as a society. Thus, Auroville could be defined as a multi-cultural meeting point and living laboratory that is exploring the frontier of a new millennium in conscious living. Whatever Auroville’s material achievements, however, the main aim is the inner change, for Auroville understands that without a radical change in consciousness, no permanent outer change can be effected.
Auroville has received the endorsement of the General Conference of UNESCO in four resolutions and of the Government of India, which has accorded it a unique legal status.
Mission Statement:
The mission of the Institute for Integral Health is to provide the community of Auroville with an effective health care system. It has chosen to accomplish this task by adopting the recently emerging health care model called the integrative practice of medicine. This model is based upon the collaboration of multiple systems working together to provide comprehensive holistic care: These include but are not limited to; western allopathic, naturopathic, traditional Asian and energetic methods of healing. By combining the various diagnostic and treatment strengths of diverse systems, the integrative model effectively addresses where the current system is limited. It does this by providing low cost health care that prevents and treats disease. This subject will be more deeply explored further in this proposal.
The current population of the Auroville community is over 2000 people, with up to 3000 in the guest season. A community of this size clearly needs its own health care system. Therefore, the Institute has dedicated itself to effectively providing comprehensive heath care to the community of Auroville by adopting the Integrative model of medicine.
Vision: The Integrative Medical Model

An integrative model of medicine holds to the truth that the human being is more complex than merely the combination of biology and physiology. One way to look at it is, that we are more like a garden than a machine. In a machine, you can separate each individual part from one another and still clearly understand its function. Whereas for a garden to be healthy and flourish, vast ranges of multidimensional relationships need to be held in balance; the soil, the seeds, proper sunlight, temperature, and nutrition are a few to name here. This is the basic difference between what is called reduction and non-reduction science. In the non-reduction system, clarity is found by looking at the individual in relationship to the whole. In the reduction way of looking at things, you cut the whole into smaller and smaller pieces in an attempt to understand it.
Modern physics has actually validated that the only way to truly comprehend the nature of reality is through looking at things in a non-reduction way. However, traditional allopathic medicine as it is currently practiced has not been able to embrace this non-reduction scientific fact. This is not to say that standard allopathic medicine does not have its place; it just needs to be understood where that place is. Its diagnostics and emergency care are one example of where it is superior. However, in the realm of most chronic disease that is plaguing large portions of the present earth’s population, it has been clearly demonstrated that the allopathic way is far from effective; side effects from toxic pharmaceuticals, high costs, and its futility in the prevention and treatment of chronic illness are now being well recognized. Without a doubt, a new model based upon a more holistic understanding is needed to overcome this situation.
We wish to emphasize that the patient has a major responsibility for his/her health through leading a healthy balanced life as well as developing a deeper awareness for his/her role in caring for our planet.
The recently emerging integrative model of medicine recognizes that there is no irrelevant part of the whole picture. It then offers comprehensive holistic care by embracing and utilizing the strengths and weaknesses of a wide variety of medical systems and traditions. In order to practice by this model there are many factors that need to be considered. The following points are some of the essentials:
o All the modalities practicing in this collaborative way see the importance of holding the entire picture in consideration.
o Practitioners that are part of an integrative team embrace the reality that we are affected by our lifestyle, emotions and psychology. In fact, medical science has recently shown that simple low cost dietary and lifestyle measures are effective in the prevention and reversal of up to 95 percent of many modern day chronic diseases; diabetes, heart disease and certain kinds of cancer are a few to name here. This knowledge is therefore established into an integrative clinical team’s overall approach to health care.
o To state the obvious, preventative measures to healthcare are just as important, if not more so, than illness based approaches. If you can keep the people from getting sick, it is clearly better than taking care of them once they are!
o Each patient’s care is individually tailored to his or her needs. This involves the development of new holistic lines of diagnostics and treatments.
o An understanding that the body’s life force is always in the direction of positive health; what is referred to in biology as homeostasis. This inherent self-healing capacity is then utilized in the process of prevention as well as treatment.
o The importance of diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools that are non-toxic, minimally invasive, and inexpensive is honored.

In order to achieve this mission, there are three categories of activities that the proposed Health Institute will be engaged in. These three categories comprise the essential pillars needed to effectively practice integrative medicine.
The Three Pillars of Integrative Medicine:
1. Integral patient care
2. Education and Research
3. Public Health Care

Integral Patient Care
There are several features that are inherent to the day-to-day practice of Integral Patient Care. Some of the primary ones are:
1. The Team: An experienced multi-disciplinary practitioner team comprised of individuals who have a sincere aspiration to practice integrative medicine. This aspiration is born from insight into the strengths and limitations of individual medical systems, as well as by seeing the value of forming alliances with other schools of thought. Therefore, all practitioners that are part of this team will possess a willingness to educate themselves as to these other systems, as well as be open to collaborating with them.
2. The Facility: A clinic that provides appropriate space for the comprehensive practice and collaboration of all therapies. Plans are to include treatment rooms suitable for the specifics of each of the modalities, a meeting area, a diagnostic lab, medical imagery, an emergency first aid and minor surgery room, and an integrative pharmacy (including, but not limited to allopathic, herbal, nutritional, homeopathic, and flower remedies).
3. Integrative Patient Care: Patient care will be based upon all systems of medicine working in a complementary relationship with one another. In addition to everyday clinical practice, certain activities will be in place to support the process of integration. Such as:
• Health Navigation: A trained Navigator serves the purpose of helping guide the patient and the practitioners in the process of creating integrative treatment plans. The Navigator facilitates this process by possessing a familiarity with traditional and complementary medical systems as well as the patient’s unique situation. They then guide the patient and practitioners by designing and keeping to an evolving treatment plan.
• Patient Care Conferences: Weekly meetings with the practitioner team as well as the Navigator to discuss any day-to-day clinical issues. In these meetings, any of the practitioners may present a case and get the teams input. Or specific clinical topics may be chosen for discussion such as; a multimodality dialogue on the treatment of various conditions or any other pertinent clinical issue.
• Shared medical record: Part of the practice of Integrative medicine is for each patient to have one medical chart that is shared for his or her entire care. This allows for the medical treatment to be seen by each provider in relationship to the whole picture. This chart then also serves as part of the process in educating all providers about their colleague’s systems of medicine.
• Patient Education
4. Home Health Care Service: For accidents, post operative, and the elderly, and for people who are too ill to come to the clinic, an on-call doctor, nurse or therapist will make home visits.
5. A referral network and liaison with qualified practitioners and health care facilities: Relationships will be made within and outside of Auroville with specialists and facilities that fill health care needs where the clinic is unable to do so.
2. Education & Research:
The integrative model of medicine holds that health is a combination of mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing. That being the case, for it to be practiced, the practitioners as well as the public need to be involved in a process of education and research.
Education
Auroville has a wide selection of sources that can be utilized to fill this requirement; there are numerous talented health practitioners, many competent exercise instructors, classes on nutrition, spiritual and psychological counselors and a wide range of workshops currently to draw upon. Part of the job of the Health institute will be to educate itself as well as the community. This is a necessary step for the clinical team; to recognize what is needed and then determine how to use what is available, or to invite healthcare professionals from outside of Auroville, to effectively fill those needs. This subject matter is too vast to be completely outlined here. However, for the purpose of this proposal, a general list of educational categories that are required in the practice of integrative medicine is now provided.

Categories of Education:

• Health Education: In order for Integrative medicine to be practiced, the community that it serves needs to have proper education about healthy living available. This primarily consists of classes and literature that address the triad of physical, emotional, mental, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. For example topics are:
o The management of stress and lifestyle related issues such as chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, insomnia, migraines and chronic back issues.
• Team member education: In addition to the task of continuing education in one’s chosen field of medicine, all members of an integrative medical unit need to be continuously expanding their knowledge about other disciplines. The key point here is not to learn how to practice other systems of medicine, but rather when to incorporate them as part of an integrative treatment plan. This aspect of education forms the foundation for appropriate referrals as well as lifestyle recommendations.
• Introductory Integrative Medical Courses to Medical Professionals within and outside of Auroville: Introductory certificate and diploma courses in the Integral Paradigm of preventative as well as curative medicine will be developed and offered to the professional medical community. Subjects will be covered such as Integrative approaches to: Physiology and anatomy, various pathologies, first aid, and any other topic that has been learned through the first hand experience of the Institute.
• Professional Trainings: Another part of the health institute’s long-term vision is to offer professional training certificate programs. These will be in areas such as; Integral Psychotherapy, Craniosacral Therapy, Acupuncture, Massage, etc. and will be developed and offered to:
o Health professionals who wish to expand their scope of practice
o Or anyone with a sincere aspiration to enter into the field of healing arts.

Research
Like already mentioned, research and education go hand in hand. This is due to the simple fact that in order to educate research has to be done, and in the process of researching one is being educated. That being said there are certain projects that are referred to as a research projects. In these types of projects, information is gathered in order to determine what is true or not. Once this is recognized, it can then be published. This research then serves to educate the professional as well as the lay community.
Part of Auroville’s as well as the health institute’s vision is to share itself with the world. Research is one of the main means where the Health institute plans to take part in this vision.
From an integrative medical perspective, research studies can be broken into various categories. The following is a list and brief description of some of these categories as well as example studies within them:
• Comparison based studies: The effectiveness of integrative medicine in comparison to the standard allopathic model in the treatment of specific conditions.
o Chronic lower back pain: A multilayered study based upon a comparison in overall pain levels. Comparison would be made between non-surgical, surgical, non-surgical integrative and post-surgical integrative approaches.
o The treatment of Depression: This study would focus on overall mood levels in patients diagnosed with various states of depression. The comparison would then be made between the standard allopathic SSRI treatment and either an integrative non-pharmaceutical and/or integrative pharmaceutical protocols.
• Modality specific studies: This is when research is done to determine the effectiveness of any specific modality. Some examples are:
o The prevention and treatment of either Diabetes or Heart Disease with a non-animal protein based whole food diet.
o Cranial Sacral efficacy in the treatment of post motor vehicle whiplash syndromes.
o Acupuncture’s efficacy in pain management
o Or mindfulness based stress reduction as part of the treatment process in hypertension.
• Studies into the scientific method itself: This is an investigation into the question of how to conduct studies themselves. Is it possible, or how to get a clear picture when using the current reductionist scientific method to analyze a non-reductionist method such as Integrative medicine? This is a topic that is outside of this author’s qualifications to say anything further about; so for now, it will just be presented as an interesting example.
• The Institutes internal research: This is taking a look at how the Institute itself is functioning. This type of research involves gathering and reviewing suggestions and feedback from the community as well as from the members of the Institute itself. Once information is gathered it is then analyzed. Then we can determine which changes need to be made and how to go about making them.

3. Prevention through Public Health Care
Public health care is described as hygienic and epidemiological supervision for disease prevention caused by environmental, social, nutritional risk factors. There needs to be a system in place for the community to deal with the spread of infections and poisons through various media such as water, air, soil and food and also to deal with disasters. The following services need to be provided:
1. Identification: Keeping up with and identifying risk factors creating standards and regulations to deal with their possible consequences.
2. Monitoring and control
3. Public notification system
4. Emergency Response: Trained emergency response teams that are able to handle evacuations in cases of high health hazards
5. Education: Teaching, instruction and training of the general public, volunteers, staff, etc
Proposed Development
Presently the Health Institute is composed of a team of multidisciplinary health professionals and an administrative management team. Since 2008, they have been engaged in the process of developing the Institute and have been occupying a Clinic at Kailash in Auroville. This is a small rented space that the present team has already outgrown. It is clear that the project is ready to move onto its next stage of evolution. Thus a two-phase plan has been created:

The Two Phase Development Plan
Site permission has been granted on a 2.5 acre piece of land in Auroville, on crown road. We are just awaiting building permission prior to the actual commencement of construction.
Phase I – This includes only those requirements for which construction can be completed by the end of 2013.
Phase II – Builds additional spaces and expands the range of outpatient holistic care; adding X-ray, ultrasound and more facilities for inpatient care. This phase is planned to be completed by the end of 2015.
A more detailed explanation of these two phases is now provided:
Building Parameters
Green building
Green building is a practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources– energy, water, materials–while reducing impacts on human health and the environment throughout the building’s life cycle. It accomplishes this through better sitting, design, construction, operation, and maintenance.
Around the world, scientists now speak about a “carbon footprint” that is directly related to global warming and a “green house effect” damaging the whole ecosystem of our planet. Green building starts with reducing the carbon footprint.
The Institute’s infrastructure will be modeled on integrated systems design and sustainable building principles, creating a synergy of function to provide:
• Temperature control: Optimum passive cooling as opposed to powered air conditioning, maximising stable temperatures throughout the day. Even at the hottest time of the year, the inside temperature should never rises above 33.5 degrees Celsius.
• Privacy: The principles of construction provide for minimal sound impact, limiting exposure to sound pollution. The rooms can be closed to provide confidentiality without interfering with temperature control.
• Cleanliness: Proficient construction prevents the intrusion of dirt and insects thereby providing an environment which requires a minimum of time and energy to maintain hygiene.
• Low-maintenance: The combination of efficient construction and protection from the elements ensures an overall reduction in maintenance expenditures and a longer structural lifespan.
• Design and arrangements: Feng shui and/or Vastu will be incorporated.
Infrastructure:
Water: The Institute has a preliminary agreement for connection to the existing well at Arka (which was initially made for an anticipated Integral Health Centre).
Electricity: Connection to the existing transformer next to Surrender community needs to be verified with Auroville Electric Service.
Solar System: Mainly for lighting purposes.
Waste Water Treatment Plant
Rain Water Harvesting
Landscaping: The envisioned surrounding gardens with ponds and pathways will give a park-like atmosphere to the area.

Quality Assurance
Quality Management System (ISO-9001) will be adopted and implemented over a period of a 2 year period. During 2009, the core management team will work out and document procedures to be followed at the Institute and follow a process of continuous monitoring, internal audit and external audit.
Beneficiaries
All Aurovilians, Newcomers, guests, students and volunteers of Auroville.
Project Team
Executives
Jocelyn Brynhild
Dr. Ruslan Yeskendirov
Dr. Sumeet Kumar
Manfred Lehnert

Core Team Members
Moghan Mehlem
Veronica Stansby
Organization Chart
Funding Sources
Project Funding (Setup)
1. Individual donations from Aurovilians
2. Donations from Auroville Units
3. Donations from AVI, Friends of Auroville
4. Auroville Municipal Services Fund and FAMC
5. Auroville Foundation
6. Other Donors
Operational funding (Recurring Expenses)
Auroville Central Fund – for maintenances of staff, operational expenses, utilities, etc.
Auroville Health Fund (community fund for health care supported by monthly contributions made by all those utilising the service) – for running expenses
Payments for the services rendered to registered guests of Auroville
Regular donations from Aurovilians and Friends of Auroville
Space requirements
Phase I
Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Waiting Area + Reception + Medical Records 1 30 30
Consultation Rooms 3 16 48
Physiotherapy / Osteopathy 1 16 16
Emergency Room + Minor OT 1 24 24
Dressing rooms (clean and septic) 2 12 24
In-patient rooms 2 15 30
Laboratory 1 24 24
Pharmacy 1 24 24
Office + Meeting + Admin Room 1 30 30
Toilets / showers 1 16 16
Staff Room + Small Pantry 1 30 30
Laundry 1 6 6
Store room 1 12 12
Maintenance, with its own store 1 12 12
Sterilization 1 6 6
Total Carpet Area 332
Total Plinth Area 465

Phase II
Medical Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Physiotherapy Room 2 14 28
Emergency Room 1 25 25
Observation Room 1 20 20
In-patient Rooms 4 16 64
X-Ray 1 30 30
Scan, ECG 1 14 14
Dressing Room 1 14 14
Pharmacy – second room 1 14 14
Toilet/shower 2 No. – 10sq.m and 6sq.m 1 16 16
Laundry 1 12 12
Waste Collection 1 10 10
Store room 2 12 24
Sterilization 1 10 10
Total Carpet Area 281
Total Plinth Area 393

Note: Staff Room and Planning/Meeting Rooms moved to Common Block

Natural Therapies Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Waiting Area + Reception 1 18 18
Acupuncture Room 1 25 25
Cranio Sacral Therapy Room 1 20 20
Psycho therapy and Homeopathy Room 1 20 20
Ayurveda Room 1 20 20
Energy Therapies Room 1 20 20
Yoga Therapy + Small Groups Rooms 1 30 30
Training + Workshops + Library + Big Groups 1 50 50
Toilet/shower 2 + dressing 1 20 20
Maintenance, with its own store 1 12 12
Total Carpet Area 235
Total Plinth Area 329

Admin/Common Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Computer Room 1 20 20
Public Health 1 25 25
Cafeteria 1 50 50
Total Carpet Area 95
Total Plinth Area 133

Staff/Guest Quarters Block

Description of spaces No Sqm Total
Rooms 2 30 60
Common Room 1 20 20
Total Carpet Area 80
Total Plinth Area 112

Total Carpet Area for Phase II 691
Total Plinth Area for Phase II 967
Budget
Phase I
Budget Heading Cost per unit in Rs. Number of Units Total Cost in Rs. Total Cost in Euros
1 € = Rs. 65 Total Cost in Dollars
1 $US = Rs. 50
1. Construction costs 15,000 389 sq.m. 69,75,000 107,308 139,500
including Rainwater harvesting
2. Infrastructure 10,96,000 16,861 21,920
– Electrical connection to a transformer 100,000
– Connection to the water well of Arka 50,000

– Roads and path ways 150,000
– Gate and fencing 150,000
– Parking shade 40,000
– Telephone / Internet 20,000
– Landscaping + clearing the ground 31,000
– Waste Water Treatment Plant 250,000
– Solar system 200,000
3. Other Costs 25,00,000 38,461 50,000
– equipment – medical
– equipment – office 1,900,000
600,000
TOTAL 105,71,000 162,631 211,420
Phase II
Budget Heading Cost per unit in Rs. Number of Units Total Cost in Rs. Total Cost in Euros
1 € = Rs. 65 Total Cost in Dollars
1 $US = Rs. 50
1. Construction costs 15,000 967 sq.m. 145,05,000 223,153 290,100
2. Infrastructure 25,00,000 38,460 50,000
3. Other Costs 40,00,000 61,540 80,000
– equipment – medical
– equipment – office 3,200,000
800,000
TOTAL 210,05,000 323,155 420,100
Donations
From Within Auroville
The Institute’s Auroville Financial Services account number is: 251938.
From Outside Auroville
Direct Bank transfer
STATE BANK OF INDIA, AUROVILLE TOWNSHIP, Tamil Nadu, India
Branch Code 03160 Swift Code SBININBB474
Account AUROVILLE UNITY FUND Account Number 10237876508
Narration Please mention [For Auroville Institute for Integral Health]
By Credit Card
in USA:
https://secure.aviusa.org/donations_donatenow.php
in UK:
www.aviuk.org/fundraising.htm
Via Auroville International
Contact information for the various AVI Centers is at http://www.auroville-international.org/main/centres/index.html
Proposed Architectural Plan
Site Plan

Ground Floor Plan

Section View

Aerial View

Glossary
Integral/Holistic Health
Holistic health is an approach to health care that views the human as a multi-dimensional being. It sees the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of life as closely interconnected.
Public Health
Public health is the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals.
Quality Management System
Quality Management System (QMS) can be defined as a set of policies, processes and procedures required for planning and execution (production / development / service) in the core business area of an organization. QMS integrates the various internal processes within the organization and intends to provide a process approach for project execution. QMS enables the organizations to identify, measure, control and improve the various core business processes that will ultimately lead to improved business performance.
ISO
ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards.
• ISO 9001
The ISO 9000 family addresses “quality management”. This means what the organization does to fulfill the customer’s quality requirements, and applicable regulatory requirements, while aiming to enhance customer satisfaction, and achieve continual improvement of its performance in pursuit of its objectives.
• ISO 14001
The ISO 14000 family addresses “environmental management”. This means what the organization does to minimize harmful effects on the environment caused by its activities, and to achieve continual improvement of its environmental performance.
Green Building
Green building is the practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources — energy, water, and materials — while reducing building impacts on human health and the environment during the building’s life cycle, through better siting, design, construction, operation, maintenance.
Appendix 1 – Key Personnel Profiles
Dr. Ruslan Yeskendirov
Nationality Kazakh
Professional degree(s)
• M.D. Pediatrics
Medical/health-care related work experience
• Hospice of Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – March 1999 to January 2002, as a director.
• Regional Pediatric Hospital, Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – in 2000 (11 months), as a doctor-intern.
• ASKO clinic, Pavlodar City – 2000 to 2001, as a general physician.
• Governmental City Emergency Medical Service of Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan – October 2001 to February 2002, as a doctor of pediatrics in the ambulance service.
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Auroville Health Centre – April 2002 – May 2008, as a general physician.
• Kailash Clinic – July 2008 till now.
Your role in the project
• Doctor
• Project development
• Organization of medical processes
• Organizational development
Dr. Sumeet Kumar
Nationality Indian
Professional degree(s)
• Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery (M.B.B.S.) in 1983, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay, India.
• Master of Surgery (M.S.) in Gen. Surgery in 1986, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay, India.
Medical/health-care related work experience
• From March 1984 to May 1991, Various Surgical Residency positions, At K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay and R.M.L. Hospital, Delhi, India.
• From June 1991 to Nov 1993, General Surgeon, National Iranian Oil Company, Iran. Managed the surgical facilities at the National Iranian Oil Company Hospital at Masjid Sulayman, Iran.
• From April 1993 to December 1996, Own Surgical Practice at India. Practiced as a Surgical Consultant to a number of hospitals in Bangalore, India.
Other Experience
• Vice President Healthcare Division, Eutech Cybernetics, Singapore from 1997 to 2005. Developed and implemented Hospital Information Systems in SE Asia and USA
Your role in the project
• Represent IHC in legal & professional forums in India
• Help create professional guidelines
• Sign legal documents
• Planning, Fund Raising
Jocelyn Brynhild
Nationality: American

Medical/health-care related work experience
• Homeopathic Educational Services, California – 6 years
• Acupressure Technician, California
• Rosen Practitioner, California
• Center of International Medicine, Oakland, California – Administrator – 3 year
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Consultant for administration at Auroville Quiet Healing Center
Your role in the project
• Executive
• Fund raising

Veronica Stansby
Nationality British
Professional degree(s) Naturopath, Cranio Sacral Biodynamics Therapist, Core Process Psychotherapy, Trauma Therapy
Medical/health-care related work experience
• Clinic for Natural Medicine and Bodywork from 1990 – 2003 Germany
• Craniosacral Therapy and Counseling in both Quiet and Pitanga
from 2001-2007
• Kailash Clinic since August 2008

Your role in the project
• Naturopath, Craniosacral Therapist
• Project development
• Development of Integrative Medical approach
• Organisational development

Moghan Mehlem
Nationality French
Professional degree(s) Psychotherapist
Medical/health-care related work experience
• In France, 1998 to 2008, psychotherapist in psychosomatic and systemic group therapy.
• Trainer
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Psychotherapist working in Pitanga and Kailash Clinic since 3 years
Your role in the project
• Psychotherapist
• Project development
• Development of Training and Education
• Architecture & Construction Supervision

Manfred Lehnert
Nationality German
Professional degree(s) Dipl-Ing. Physikalische Technik (Engineer applied physics)
Medical/health-care related work experience in Auroville
• Health engineering in safe water, sanitation, safe food, health- and hygienic education in AVHS
Your role in the project
• Executive
• Planning, especially infrastructure, water, waste water, electricity
• Prevention systems

Contact Information
Kailash Clinic
Auroville, 605 101, TN, India
Ph: +91-413-2622803
+91-9442066737 (Dr. Ruslan)
Email: ihs@auroville.org.in